'New York,' 'New York': King of the Hill, Top of the Heap?

Just a bit more than two years ago, in a surprise last-minute move, Bruce Wasserstein won the auction to buy New York magazine. Just a bit less than two years ago, in a surprise move, Adam Moss left the Times to become editor of New York. For the last two years, then, a common Manhattan media conversation starter has been, "So, what do you think of the new New York?" In a press release issued this afternoon and based upon various just-compiled 2005 statistics, the magazine itself thinks it has an answer:

New York magazine ranked 6th among all measured magazines in overall ad pages in 2005, according to Publisher's Information Bureau, the title's highest placement in 20 years and a move up from 10th place in 2004....

Circulation growth was also impressive with newsstand sales in the second half of 2005 increasing 16% compared to the second half of 2004. In addition, online subscriptions grew 16% in 2005, posting 17,438 subscriptions at little cost to the magazine....

The 14.7% growth in ad pages in 2005 was higher than the rate of growth for all of New York magazine's core competitors, including the New Yorker (-3%,) Time Out New York (3%,) and the New York Times Magazine (9.1%).

Of course, that's exactly what you'd expect the mag's communications staff to say. And God knows we wouldn't do any actual reporting to find out if it's all true, or all properly contextualized. So we're happy to hear any counterarguments. Numbers they're not mentioning? Outside factors they're taking credit for? Trends they're ignoring? We're all ears.

Until then, though, color us a little bit impressed.

The full release is after the jump.

For Immediate Release
January 25, 2006

Contact: Betsy Burton
212-508-XXXX

New York magazine is #6 in the U.S. in Ad Pages for 2005

Weekly Posts Circulation Gains
and Continues Advertising Growth

New York magazine ranked 6th among all measured magazines in overall ad pages in 2005, according to Publisher's Information Bureau, the title's highest placement in 20 years and a move up from 10th place in 2004. New York magazine posted 3041.79 pages for the year - a 14.7% increase over the previous year's count of 2651.98.

Circulation growth was also impressive with newsstand sales in the second half of 2005 increasing 16% compared to the second half of 2004. In addition, online subscriptions grew 16% in 2005, posting 17,438 subscriptions at little cost to the magazine. Renewal rates grew over 5% and gift subscriptions increased by 50%.

"Thanks to the buzz about New York magazine's exceptional editorial product, readers and advertisers are responding to the magazine more than ever," said publisher Larry Burstein. "Advertisers understand the authority of the brand in the world's most important marketplace and beyond. We are well positioned for continued success in 2006."

The 14.7% growth in ad pages in 2005 was higher than the rate of growth for all of New York magazine's core competitors, including the New Yorker (-3%,) Time Out New York (3%,) and the New York Times Magazine (9.1%). Paging growth for the industry was essentially flat at .5%.

New York magazine showed particularly strong ad page gains in real estate, banks, and credit cards, growing the business and technology page count by 78% over 2004. The watches, jewelry and apparel categories also realized significant increases.

Source: Publisher's Information Bureau/CMR.

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