Watch Out, Little Ones! Rosé Now In With the Wall Street Journal Crowd

It was just last summer that Sunday Styles declared rosé the official new drink of young American cool. They cited everyone: not just the MisShapes but such hipster royalty as Jay McInerney and the guitarist from Franz Ferdinand. Rosé was the "summer drink to be seen with;" the owner of the Maritime Hotel—that's where Hiro Ballroom is—compared one brand in particular to 501 jeans and called it a "groundswell buzz name." This weekend, almost a year later, the trend comes full circle, as rosé is featured in "Tastings," the Wall Street Journal wine column written by a pair of old people named Dorothy J. Gaiter and John Brecher. The sun, they say, is "rising on rosé." And in true hipster fashion, they claim that they've been saying it since 2000.

The article begins with an astonishing anecdote about Dorothy and John's daughter Zoë—their younger one, the one whose name is not Media (wtf). It's an anecdote that arguably lends credence to last summer's Sunday Styles piece:

We arrived home the other day to find our daughter Zoë, a talented photographer, taking pictures of some wine bottles that we had taken out of shipping crates earlier. This surprised us. Many years ago, our daughters got tired of Mommy and Daddy endlessly discussing wine and have done their best to ignore our passion ever since. We're sure that, out of spite, they are going to grow up to be beer drinkers. What possessed Zoë? The wines were rosés and, lined up on the table, they were as pretty as the colors of the sunrise, from light pink to blazing orange.
So basically the parents walked in on their hip young daughter taking photos of their wine. Why was she doing it? Because the rosé is a cool wine, probably! But mom and dad aren't going to let their little girl slide so easy: "we said two years ago that the floodgates of rosé were beginning to open. Well, whooooosh. They're wide open now."

Hear that, Sia Michel and Julie Chaplin? Wide open. Here's a video of it happening.

Tastings: The Rising Fortunes of Rosé [WSJ]