Will Smith To Infiltrate China, Usher In New Era Of Cultural Openness

· Studios are reviving Hollywood's love affair with the Super Bowl's TV audience, with at least eight movie commercials scheduled to air during the game—at a record price of $2.7-3 million per 30 seconds. Cinematic product you'll be sold in between supposedly clever ads for watery domestic beer: Iron Man, Will Smith's Hancock, and Will Ferrell's Semi Pro. [Variety]
· The Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp forecasts that the writers strike will cost the local economy $220 million each month it drags on, and has already caused $342 million in "lost wages and ripple effects" on related businesses. Now we all have a staggering dollar amount to attach to our free-floating strike dread. [THR]

· Sam Raimi will return to the "genre roots" he momentarily abandoned to swing around a spandex-clad Tobey Maguire from some wires to direct Drag Me to Hell, an Evil Deadesque project which he co-wrote with his brother. [Variety]
· Not even China's culturally protectionist government can resist Will Smith's big-screen charms, lifting a ban on Western movies to release The Pursuit of Happyness. [THR]
· Oh happy day! Kenny G makes a deal with Starbucks to release Rhythm and Romance—his first album of Latin love songs!—around Valentine's Day, a move that will provide coffee lovers a chance to return home from their macchiato runs with the sensual soundtrack for an evening of saxophone-enhanced lovemaking sessions. [Variety]