Why the Web couldn't save "Jericho"

Jericho, CBS's excellent postapocalyptic drama set in rural Kansas has been cancelled. Again. Jericho drew a large following among the tech demo. Besides the obvious sci-fi draw, Jericho explored themes of government intervention and self-sufficiency, which are passionate topics among the more tinfoil-hat Libertarians of the Web. But shows that please netizens aren't moneymakers.

"Save this show" drives are a tradition among cult favorites like Firefly and Star Trek. Like those shows, Jericho drew an impassioned response from angry viewers — including myself — when it was cancelled the first time. In a rare instance that proved the exception to the rule, the fan reaction got Jericho back on the air. In the end though, low ratings just proved that CBS executives were right to yank it all along. It just didn't have the mainstream pull required of a big-budget network TV show. Supposedly there has been interest from the NBC-owned cable channels Sci-Fi and USA Network, but nothing has gotten beyond rumor.

Brace yourself for the commentards who will no doubt petition CBS to stream Jericho online in 2-minute microchunks, and promote it via YouTube links on Twitter. That's not the solution. Making a show as good as Jericho costs millions of dollars. If the viewers aren't there, online or off, it will never make back its production costs. Want to save Jericho? Start your own TV network, bub.