A Brief History Of 'Jailbait' ExploitationAs loud as the uproar over Miley Cyrus' too-racy photo shoot gets, she of course is not the first young star to be packaged as a sly sex symbol. The American print media, and its advertisers, have a history of getting into trouble for this sort of thing. The two common methods are to either portray an underage girl (or, less often, boy) in an overly sexualized light, or to use "barely legal" girls in a way that evokes underage taboos with a wink and a nod. It's really a standard form, at this point. After the jump, we've compiled some of the most famous ad campaigns and media spreads that play the slick jailbait game. Does this stuff work? Apparently so.

Vanity Fair's Miley Cyrus shoot




Calvin Klein's 1980 Brooke Shields Ads, when she was 15

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Calvin Klein's 1995 Child Porn-like ad campaign






High School Musical star Vanessa Hudgens' 'High School Lolita' spread in GQ

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Flat Out Weird Clarica Investment Advisors ad, featuring gratuitous jailbait