Fake-Cancer Survivor Sharon Stone Still Paying Price For Controversial 'Karma Tectonics' Theory

Sharon Stone continues to field the fallout of having weighed in at Cannes with some highly controversial armchair-theorizing about what might have caused the devastating earthquake that snuffed nearly Chinese 70,000 lives, many of them children. (Crux of her argument: It was the act of a vigilante Buddha.) After being dropped by Dior as the face of their Chinese marketing campaign, the actress and outspoken vagtivist has now been disinvited from the Shanghai International Film Festival:

Festival spokeswoman Tang Bing said...film festival organizers sent Stone a letter protesting her remarks and demanding an apology.

The Hollywood actress impressed festival organizers with her charity work and her appearance last year, and her comments came as a surprise, Tang said.

"She showed her affinity for the Chinese people and her affinity for Shanghai. She didn't say any bad things," said Tang.

While Stone's reputation seems tarnished beyond repair, we'd like to point out that this is hardly the first controversial statement to tumble from her exquisitely lunatic mind, and yet she always manages to find a way to bounce back into the public's good graces. We're reminded by Washingtonian.com, for example, of the time in 1995 when she announced to a breast cancer foundation luncheon: "Four years ago I was told I had cancer, lymph cancer. . . . I had a lump in every lymph area of my body... Very, very fortunately for me, with a lot of positive thinking and a lot of holistic healing—I say that in a very personal sense because I know that that's a personal approach—I ended up testing negative for lymph cancer, but it took several months, and those months changed my life. And one of the changes during that time is that I stopped drinking coffee, and when I stopped drinking coffee, ten days later I had no tumors in any of my lymph glands." Somehow, boosted by the healing power of coffee grounds and karmic revenge, we think she'll muddle through this bump-in-the-road, too.