How Google can whore out its virtual worldLively, Google's entry into the 3D-avatar chat market, has been neutered before its time, writes the Economist. But in the midst of the starchy business newspaper's tour of the service, its editors hit on the solution: "Although some popular rooms—“Love Sweet Love” and “Sexy Babes Club”—have had thousands of visitors, the number quickly drops into the double digits further down the list." It's obvious, yes? Even if your terms of service beat sex into submission, users will find their own way to slip it back in. They're feeling lucky, even if Lively's product managers aren't. So why not embrace what a truly open sex market, powered by Google, could look like?An index of commercial sex. Within a few months of Lively permitting fantasy prostitution, the data gleaned from what kinds of sex, with what genders of avatars, and for how much would start to stack up server-side. Wouldn't this data, properly analyzed, be a boon to Internet-based escorts who use AdWords to promote their business? A clean, well-lit place to cruise. Virtual worlds run on the same principal as Vegas: Build something friendly yet sexy, and let the users pretend they're not there to get turned on. Full-on brothels and strip clubs may not even result in much feigned sexual activity within Lively, but they will give users a specific place to bring their sex talk — one that other users can avoid if they choose. "But what about the children?" They already have the kids-only virtual world Club Penguin. And MySpace chat. If they have access to Craigslist, the kids already know what prostitution looks like.