How to Lose Friends and Alienate People Film LaunchBrit outsider Toby Young has made a career out of getting fired from Vanity Fair, among other things. How to Lose Friends and Alienate People is now a movie—take that, Graydon Carter. A gathering was held at Soho House to celebrate, and to give people the chance to pretend to be friends with some while alienating others. What advice would Young give to the young creative underclass trying to make it? "Don't get too comfortable," he said, after clambering off the table on which he had been speechifying about feeling "like a hobbit in the kingdom of ill" and getting heckled by Kirsten Dunst. In today's media jungle, "you could get fired within the next 48 hours." Click for photos by Nikola Tamindzic and gossip.New York Times reporter and recovery memoirist David Carr brought up the afternoon's faux pas: I had impulsively Facebook-friended him without, um, meeting him before. "I hovered over your picture for a moment," he rasped. "I thought, 'She seems nice!" He seized me by the shoulders. "Are you going to ass-fuck me, though? You really can't tell." Carr's close personal friend in sobriety, actor Tom Arnold, said he just loved fameballs like Julia Allison. Really? "Yes!" Why would an actual celebrity care about fake famous people? "Their stories are well-written... Do you like them? Do you hate them? I can't tell. I see you guys trying out other people, seeing how they'll play." Fameball tryouts! He hugged me. Observer roustabout George Gurley was lamenting his one-month-and-counting ban from celeb coke den Beatrice Inn, from which he was barred after his affectionate piece about the West Village bar ran in Fashion Week Daily. He's been "so much more productive" during his shutout. Kirsten Dunst probably hasn't, though, as they let her in the door quite often. Dating columnist Julia Allison refuted dating rumors in legalese: "I'm technically single." Also: "I am hiring a publicist as soon as I get the money." But doesn't Web 2.0 allow everyone the freedom to be their own publicist? "As we've seen, that doesn't always work so well." There is a thing as too much freedom. Click for the gallery slideshow by Nikola Tamindzic/Home of the Vain: