Another Brit Joins Top Of WSJ MastheadWall Street Journal editor Robert Thomson is continuing to reshape the post-Murdoch version of the paper in his own image. In the wake of an early October reshuffling of editors, Thomson sent another top editor to lead the London bureau a few weeks ago, in a clear push to try to expand the paper's international prestige. And today Thomson told the staff that Gerard Baker is the new Deputy Editor-In-Chief of the WSJ and Dow Jones—and, like Thomson himself, Baker is veteran of the Times of London and the FT. Taste the international flavor. The full memo introducing Baker to the staff is below:
Dear Colleagues, I am delighted to announce that Gerard Baker is appointed Deputy Editor-in-Chief of The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones. Gerry has had a distinguished career as a journalist at the BBC, Financial Times and The Times of London. He has reported on subjects as diverse as the exotica of Japanese politics, the minutiae of monetary policy, and the frailties of the international financial system. In his most recent role in Washington as US Editor and Assistant Editor of The Times, Gerry has been a commentator and reporter, and so has a clear and principled understanding of the objective of objectivity. He will bring considerable energy and wit to the Journal, and assist me in overseeing the transition of the paper, the website and Newswires. Our editing troika remain at the heart of the day-to-day decisions, as do Mike Miller and Alix Freedman. Neal Lipschutz at Newswires will continue to report directly to me and Alan Murray remains at the helm of online. Gerry will edit the Journal in my absence and be tasked with accelerating our development as a national paper of influence and as an unrivalled international business news franchise. Gerry, who will take up his new position in January, received a First Class Honours degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Corpus Christi College at Oxford University. His first job after graduation was at the Bank of England. From 1988 to 1994, he worked at the BBC, initially as a producer in London and New York, and then as Economics Correspondent. In 1994, he joined the Financial Times, where he was Tokyo Correspondent, US Economics Correspondent, and Washington Bureau Chief and Associate Editor. Four years ago, he joined The Times, where he also oversaw the development of the paper's US Edition and its successful American website. Robert.