In your blustery Monday media column: The NYT's folding its City section, Sam Zell's a white devil, Fulcrum and Brandweek are teetering, and Dylan Ratigan's a populist:

Weep For The Times City Section

The New York Times is going to fold its City section as part of the cost-cutting package that came down last week, to save money on freelance payments and whatnot. This is not only disastrous for the Columbia J-school freelancers and other assorted mortals whose only hopes of getting an NYT clip was through the City section; it's equally bad for regular NYT reporters, because this is a mere foreshadowing of a coming trend called "write more stories or else." But without the City section, how will we ever know what's happening in McCarren Park's ironic sports leagues, or other places that freelancers hang out on the weekends? Democracy is dying.


Weep For The Times City Section

Brazil's president said "white people with blue eyes" were the villains of the financial crisis. Turns out he was talking about Sam Zell.


Weep For The Times City Section

Great Magazine Die-off: Hachette has apparently put design magazine Fulcrum on hold, and prospects of its revival don't sound too promising, judging from the linked internal email. If you know more, email us.


A rumor is Going Around that Nielsen will either fold Brandweek and Mediaweek into Adweek, or shrink the three titles down to two. The magazines have all been had their staffs and resources slashed recently, so this would be the next logical step. There's really no getting around the fact that Ad Age eats just about every trade magazine for lunch. [Disclosure: I've had/ have friends working at Brandweek and Adweek and Ad Age. Still Ad Age is the best.]

Weep For The Times City Section

Dylan Ratigan, who, it's widely speculated, will soon be quitting his gig as host of CNBC's Fast Money (not long after a tape of him cussing out his producer surfaced), tells Jon Friedman that he plans to pursue the story that "The value system of capitalism has been corrupted by a small group of bankers, insurance executives and politicians." Is Dylan Ratigan the first CNBC personality shamed into quitting by the rhetorical power of Jon Stewart? I don't know, but it's an angle!