No, Gay Hookup Site Did Not Do a Deal with a Gospel Choir

Ok, there weren't evil hate-mongering, gospel-singing homophobes cashing in on Manhunt, like we originally reported. As for the site's new redesign, Manhunt's CEO hates it as much as everyone else.

We had a nice chat with Jonathan Crutchley, the CEO of Manhunt.net's parent company Online Buddies Inc (nope, never saw that name on our credit card statement) and one of John McCain's most controversial contributors. Crutchley didn't have nice things to say about the site, which has the gays who go there to get laid in an uproar.

"I share your pain," he said about the new version of the site. "It's new to me. I don't like it either, but you get used to it." Asked if he's found anyone since the relaunch earlier this summer he said, "Of course."

As for our tale of evil gay-hating gospel singers cashing in on Manhunt.com, it's just not true. Crutchley told us that when the company tried to claim Manhunt.com back in 1998, but it was taken, so they got Manhunt.net instead. In 2001 they launched the popular website and trademarked using the name Manhunt for gay dating website. The company approached the gospel singers about buying the Manhunt.com domain name, but they said they were using it.

In 2006, the group stopped using the site and the domain name fell into the hands of Crazy Calm Media, who used Manhunt.com to link to their sex and hookup sites, including Bareback.com [NSFW, unless you work at a bathhouse]. In 2007, Online Buddies sued them for trademark infringement and won. Part of the settlement was ownership of the domain name, which now redirects traffic to Manhunt.net.

Yeah, way more boring than the original story. Now we're going to go and use Manhunt to see if we get used to it like Crutchley says we will. It's research, people. Research!