Not Naming 'Australian Fritzl' a Good, But Ultimately Futile, Game PlanS

Good grief! Australian authorities have arrested a man who stands accused of imprisoning his daughter for 30 years and repeatedly raping, and thus impregnating her. Unlike some similarly disturbing cases — Josef Fritzl and Phillip Garrido — he remains anonymous.

Part of us wishes Australian authorities would name this man, who reportedly started raping his daughter 30 years ago, when she was only 11-year old. Such identifications give us all a convenient "face to hate" and, therefore, a glimpse at true evil. (Fritlz, who also raped his own daughter, may be covering his face in this picture, but that didn't stop cameras, which helped propel it across the world and give us our first look at what's become too-familiar a crime.) But, our thirst for public shaming aside, not naming him may be the best move.

Unlike Fritz's daughter and Jaycee Dugard, the woman allegedly kidnapped by Garrido, the victim here will have the benefit of at least brief media silence, which spares her behind-the-back gossiping and potential stigma that can go along with such a story. More importantly, the woman had four of her father's children. Three survived. By not being named, these kids can experience a relatively normal existence, if that's even possible.

But, of course, these benefits will likely be short-lived, for the media's interest in such horror shows will no doubt extend to the November court appearances, which means that the arrest — which went down in the spring — and resulting trial will remain in the news and, we're sure, lead to an international identification of the accused offender. His daughter and her children could then be thrust into the spotlight. Hopefully they'll enjoy this brief moment of calm before the media storm.