Hundreds of Thousands Feared Dead in Haiti, Humanitarian Crisis Looms

Now journalists have their feet on the ground in Haiti we get heartbreaking coverage. It's the photographers who really shine on today's front pages, with some incredible images of dust, destruction and death.

It's really worth clicking on the papers below to enlarge them — the tabloids in particular have run enormous, fantastic pictures that do more to demonstrate what it's like when a country collapses (literally and metaphorically) than any number of interviews with survivors.

Other stuff also happened in the world:

  • Finance chiefs were 'grilled' in DC. Which means they were mildly uncomfortable for a few hours, then went back to their nice lives with no consequences.
  • The battle for Ted Kennedy's Senate seat hots up.
  • And everyone loves Nikola Tesla.

Disclosure: I freelance write and report for newspapers that are included in this roundup. Where there is a direct conflict of interest I will make it clear.

The New York Times: Simon Romero, the Caracas bureau chief, really covers some ground for this piece and this piece in Haiti. Star photographer Damon Winter has also, apparently, been flown out, so expect some more great images. There's an update on the Google and China story, Andrew Ross Sorkin weighs in on the grilling of finance chiefs yesterday, and the battle for Ted Kennedy's Massachusetts Senate seat is hotting up. Meanwhile, 8-year-olds are now on the TSA watch list.

The Washington Post: has apparently sent reporters to Haiti, but not photographers. Luckily the AP is doing a sterling job with images like this. They also look at local DC Haitians, and the US response. The paper also updates the Google in China story, alleging a wider campaign of hacking by the government, and reports on the commission interviews of finance chiefs yesterday.

The LA Times: another paper, another amazing picture (by a staff photographer) and two stories, here and here, on the Haiti crisis. Decades and worlds away, but next to these reports, is feature-y analysis of the day Nixon and Elvis met, in 1970. They also cover a new Democrat plan to fund healthcare, and the finding that morphine can ease PTSD.



The Wall Street Journal: has the big three stories too - Haiti beats the bankers getting grilled, and China and Google, despite the latter two being potential leads, one would imagine. There's also a piece on the resurgence of Nikola Tesla as an iconic figure.



The New York Post: has the same image as sister paper the Wall Street Journal. Maybe they got a bulk use discount?

The Daily News: may have won the heartbreak award with this picture.

The Daily Times (Haiti): doesn't provide a front-page image. But has some cellphone and snapshot pictures of the destruction that you won't see anywhere else.



Haiti United Press: the same is true of this French language publication.