The Google CEO and His Mistress: The Tell-All BlogS

Eric Schmidt has long campaigned for free-flowing information, and even against the very idea of secrecy. But we doubt the Google CEO loves disclosure so much he'll approve of an indiscreet blog-cum-memoir by his sometime mistress.

Schmidt parted ways with Bohner last summer, but that hasn't kept him out of what a tipster in his ex-girlfriend's social circle called her "pet project:" a multimedia confessional autobiography, including a Google-hosted blog called "Recovery Girl 007", and eventually a book.

On the blog, Bohner writes about Schmidt, dubbing him "Dr. Strangelove" and disclosing that he gave her a prototype iPhone. She also calls Steve Jobs a "stoned Jesuit preist" (more below). That aside, the intricate online memoir-in-progress primarily details Bohner's recovery from cocaine and alcohol addiction via 12-step programs and yoga.

It's not clear how Bohner is funding the project, which has seen the former CNBC correspondent hire an art director, webmaster and editor, all prominently credited here and at the bottom of this post in what might just be the most crowded masthead ever assembled for a personal Blogspot.

The Google CEO and His Mistress: The Tell-All BlogS

One gossip thinks Schmidt's money is somehow behind the project, but we're not so sure; barely a year ago, when he was still dating Bohner, the married billionare was showering her with little more than love and jewelry, despite an overture for him to put money into the documentary company where Bohner worked. Maybe Bohner's hocked some of those gifts, or is simply relying on savings. It certainly doesn't seem as though she's become reentangled with Schmidt; our tipster wrote that the couple are "hitting it too occasionally for her liking" — which could well mean not at all.

What Bohner has so far detailed of her personal autobiography is certainly rattling stuff of the sort that would pull a caring lover's heartstrings. She writes about snorting cocaine in Hyde Park, London; bingeing on tequila in Los Angeles; sipping brandy at age eight; quitting booze and then relapsing; shaking and heaving at a friend's house when trying to go dry; and getting checked in to a detox center. (It is a "Colonel Stevenson" who introduces Bohner to brandy as a child in Southern Spain. That this same Colonel Stevenson appears on Bohner's more public blog is, along with a pointer from our tipster, how we know the former Donald Trump ghostwriter is also responsible for the Recovery Girl 007 blog.)

We assume Bohner will also eventually give the backstory behind her criminal record. Using her birth day and year, gleaned from her blog, and a public records search, we found she'd been sentenced to just under three years (of probation?) in South Florida (where she now resides) for aggressive assault with a weapon, no intent to kill, in a 2005 Florida incident. In New Jersey she got three years probation for a crime we've not yet determined.

Then there were Bohner's landlord issues in New York City. After two civil filings from a building management company in late 2005 and early 2006, Bohner was forcibly evicted in May 2006, according to a public records search.

Despite repeated attempts, we were not able to elicit any quote or rebuttal from Bohner on her project or background.

The Google CEO and His Mistress: The Tell-All BlogS

On her website, Bohner writes about turning her life around with help from a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, where she worked, and from a popular Los Angeles yoga instructor, Keith Fox.

Schmidt has good reason to hope that turnaround sticks: On Bohner's site, the former business journalist writes repeatedly about the men in her life; it's not hard to imagine Bohner burning an ex who falls out of her good graces. In addition to Schmidt, Bohner's dated author Michael Lewis (to whom she was briefly married) and Lazard executive Steve Langman.

Among the lovers on the Recovery Girl site is someone code-named Dr. Strangelove, who is often in Los Angeles. "Dr." Eric Schmidt holds a Ph.D. as well as a home in Santa Barbara County. Dr. Strangelove and Eric Schmidt are one in the same, as the first of several excerpts below makes clear.

During a trip to the U.S. Virgin Islands (emphasis added):

I haven't thought about Dr. Strangelove in such a long time-I try to sweep all of that data completely under the Persian carpet. That's a lie. I think about him every so often in these fleeting cinematic flashes...I have completely stopped sleeping. My friend Jason is so worried about it that he confiscates my Blackberry... I've been sleeping with my Blackberry just in case Strangelove might send an e-mail. If I was really smart I ditch the Blackberry for the iPhone he gave me – the prototype version. But I have yet to arrive. Stephen Jobs is not St. Stephen. He's just a stoned Jesuit priest lost in his garden. Strangelove still has his stranglehold on me and nothing is new under the sun.

Later in the same post:

The dream is always the same... strolling through winding paths at a government insane asylum in northern Massachusetts.I've been committed-against my will. It is Strangelove, my genuinely caring, concerned boyfriend. He has convinced me, or, he has convinced me that I've convinced him, that I am suicidal. The dream always begins with me walking the grounds of the campus. I look for the cafeterias with the free food. I can't find the line for the free bus back to Santa Monica. I keep pulling on the locked doors.

At the Buddhist temple in Thailand:

How did I get here? There was the phone call. There was the betrayal. Dr. Strangelove had lied about his involvement in it all. And then there were a couple of conversations that followed. And all I remember feeling was that I had to get out of L.A.

After detox in South Florida:

You see I wasn't going to go back to Los Angeles. That part was clear. The L.A . experiment hadn't worked. Game over. Case closed. The work thing had ended when I went to the monastery in Thailand. And the relationship was officially over; Dr. Strangelove was dead. Next chapter.

We'll certainly be reading Bohner's future installments closely. And we're sure Schmidt will, too.