Video Resumes Will Always Make Us Look Like Idiots

Remember Aleksey Vayner, the misguided Yalie who made a terrible video resume for a banking job and then got publicly shamed for months? Well surprisingly that single act of destruction hasn't deterred the video resume boom. In fact, it's growing.

Yes, this is what The Wall Street Journal is telling us today, anyway. Well mostly they're talking about the rise of sites like BriteTab and ResumeBook.tv, which help folks make video resumes so they can get the jobs of the future, today. They go through each of the sites and make trial resumes and blah blah. They sort of miss the forest for the trees.

The real question is why would anyone ever actually want to send in some weird, canned video resume? What if it's bad lighting or your hair is off? It seems awfully dumb to potentially cancel yourself out before the employer has even glanced at your qualifications. The beauty of the non-video resume, also called "the resume," is that your credentials and whatnot are looked at first, without anything else to go on. (Besides where you went to school, how "ethnic" your name is, whether or not you have a vagina.) Then if they are impressed and call you and you shuffle in for the in-person interview with your mangled tooth and dandruff wig, you probably won't get the job, but at least you got some face time! This new techno way? Not so much.

I just can't see how people won't be stilted and uncomfortable and sort of lame — despite their likely not-at-all lameness in real life — on an inherently cheesy video resume. I mean, look, this resume won an award of some kind from Vault.com:


It's OK... but that's the best? "I like to kick back with hip hop music"? Really? I'm sure you do, but why does a potential employer need to know that, ever? Call me Old Grandpa Rooney (because that's my college nickname), but this seems silly.

This is just some inflated trend story, right? This isn't actually happening. It can't be. This isn't some Saved by the Bell episode about video dating or video yearbooks or other modern video things. This is real life. Anyone actually run into a video resume recently?