By now, we're all familiar with Brett Favre's cellphone seduction. Who could've seen this coming, what with his "aw, shucks" persona and playing like a kid out there? Turns out the evidence was in front of us the whole time.

There's Something About Mary

Yesterday, it was hilarious and unexpected when Brett waltzed into Cameron Diaz's apartment at the end of the movie. But today we see that the Farrelly Brothers were looking clearly at the situation when they cast Brett as a stalker. Playing himself, Brett clearly doesn't have to flex his acting muscles too much to play one of Mary's stalker ex-boyfriends. The scene even includes Ben Stiller saying of Brett, "from what he told me over the phone..." a clear reference to the messages Brett would leave for Jenn Sterger twelve years later.

Wrangler Jeans Commercial

Brett's most visible endorsement has been being the spokesman for Wrangler Jeans and the commercials often feature him hanging out in (presumably) Mississippi tossing around the ol' pigskin with some friends. The commercial talks about how tough and dependable the jeans are, and by extension, how tough and dependable Brett is. Does that sound like a Craigslist Casual Encounters post to anyone else? And that "satisfaction guaranteed" line perfectly in sync with the close up of his ass is pretty obvious.

As an added bonus, this clip from a set of outtakes features Brett saying that he likes Wrangler Jeans because "they let [him] be free." Him or his penis? And free to what exactly? Make his penis easily accessible to his cell phone?

Mastercard Commercial

This classic Mastercard Priceless spot features Brett, and his wife ironically, walking through town pointing out other people's mistakes. It ends with a clear double entendre, giving us a clear look into the way his brain works.

Hyundai Commercial

In this Super Bowl ad, Brett jokes about still not having retired by 2020. There's a word for people who won't go away, who just stick around and won't leave: stalker.

Sears Commercial

This set of outtakes from a couple of Sears spots really let us look into the sordid mind of Brett Favre and two things really jump out. First, the way Brett keeps asking "what am I saying?" as if he actually is aware that he should just shut up and not, say, leave voicemail after voicemail for good looking women who work for the team he plays for. And second, that he pretends not to be himself. Is this how he plans to wriggle out from this mess, claim that the voice on Sterger's phone isn't him?