What would have happened if "Lola" had had second thoughts and spared Ray Davies's virginal protagonist the anguish of realizing that he'd been caught in a gender-bender? Terriers is here to explore the riddles of our modern morality.

There's been so much to show you from this series in recent weeks that we haven't even touched on the lovely and talented Jamie Denbo, who plays Maggie, Hank & Britt's lawyer and occasional boss. Here's Maggie filling Hank in on the hidden past of his ex-wife's fiancee Jason with her usual brilliant snark:

Meanwhile, Hank's been in physical therapy for the gunshot wound he suffered at the end of last week's episode. Since his insurance is predictably shitty, Hank's physical therapist offers to visit him for free if he and Britt take the case of his embarrassed young nephew, who's been bilked out of $400 by a completely different kind of "physical therapist:"

Michaela proves to be a great pinch-hitter while Hank is on the DL, and s/he even assists Britt and the Ocean Beach PD on a long-cold missing persons case, helping bring closure to a grieving family. Hopefully we'll get to see more of D.J. Pierce (whom you might also recognize as "Shangela" from a brief appearance on RuPaul's Drag Race) if Terriers survives longer than the next three weeks.

Back to the other "cold case" at hand: with Hank's ex's wedding only days away, he rushes to dig up more details on Jason's former life. He meets with an old reporter who covered the day-care molestation scandal when it was news, and even tracks down one of the victims, who says that while the teen-aged Jason never molested him, he was hardly innocent. After calmly informing Jason of his discoveries, Hank confronts his ex, and it's heart-wrenching:

Has that ever happened to you? Have you ever called someone out on what you thought was going to be a big, incriminating secret, only to discover that the person you thought you were trying to "save" already knew and/or didn't really care? That's the funny thing about morality: it always ends up being more relative than you want it to be.