News Corp Shareholders Don't Want Rupert Murdoch Giving All Their Money to His Family

In your glitchtastic Thursday media column: the NYT paywall debate continues, News Corp gets sued, a WaPo plagiarist reporter is suspended, a pundit is harassed, and writers are disappointed.

  • Some ungrateful News Corp shareholders are suing beneficent boss Rupert Murdoch for buying his own daughter's company with $675 million of shareholder money. Hey, if you didn't want Rupert Murdoch to use your money as his children's person piggy bank you shouldn't have invested in his company, jerks.
  • All of America's media people are contractually required to offer strong opinions on the NYT's paywall plans for the remainder of the day! Let's see. Felix Salmon wonders why there's such a disincentive to buying the iPad app, and says that the plan overall with be bad for the NYT Co. Nate Silver points out that $15 per month only works out to $0.002 per article. Sure, as long as you read all 6,500 articles every month! Jodi Kantor says, "When the nytimes.com subscription plan starts, aggregating/reprinting articles is going to feel more like filching, no?" No. The common theme here? All of these people are totally misguided! Simply continue reading Gawker and you will miss nothing. Have no fear.
  • The Washington Post has suspended veteran, Pulitzer-winning reporter Sari Horwitz for directly lifting huge portions of articles from the Arizona Republic and plopping them right down in her own WaPo stories about the Gabrielle Giffords shooting. Jayson Blair was a cokehead, what's your excuse? It's just a strange offense for a good reporter.
  • Marc Lamont Hill is a media pundit and Columbia professor and "one of the [self-proclaimed] leading hip-hop generation intellectuals in the country." He recently settled a lawsuit with the city of Philadelphia that he filed after being stopped by police there for no apparent reason. Here is his dramatic recounting of the incident. But! Some people feel that Marc is trying to milk this whole thing for publicity. The lesson here: pundits can't do anything right, no matter what.
  • Want to be a writer? Prepare for a life of disappointment.
[Photo: Getty]