Mich. Lawmaker's Plan Requires Foster Kids to Shop at Thrift Stores

Michigan State Senator Bruce Caswell wants to make sure that Michigan taxpayers' money is being used effectively. How's he going to do that? By requiring foster children to spend their clothing allowance at second-hand stores.

As everyone knows, the name of the game these days is "shared sacrifice." And who should be sacrificing the most? Probably foster kids, living high on the hog with their state-funded clothing allowances. The Detroit News reports on Caswell's proposal:

A small part of the DHS savings, about $200,000, would come from adjustments to the clothing allowance for foster children, or children of the working poor, of $79 for school clothes. Caswell said children will still get close to that $79, but would be issued gift cards that can only be used at the Salvation Army, Goodwill or other thrift stores.

"The reason is you can get a whole lot more in a resale store," Caswell said.

Caswell later explained to Michigan Public Radio that he "never had anything new," and that his dad used to say "once you're out of the store and you walk down the street, nobody knows where you bought your clothes." Plus, think of all the great vintage threads they'll find! When you really think about it, Caswell is doing these kids a favor.

[Detroit News; Michigan Public Radio via Michigan Messenger]