Tea Party Summer Camp: The Experience of a Lifetime

Is your child's summer camp a bit too... Kenyan, let's say? Don't worry! There's still space at the weeklong "Tampa Liberty School," a camp designed to help children aged 8-12 learn about important concepts like Freedom and The Gold Standard.

As the St. Petersburg Times reports, Tampa Liberty School, the brainchild of conservative writer Jeff Lukens and the Glenn Beck-inspired Tampa 912 Project, is unlike your standard public school. (Lukens admits he is "not familiar with public school curriculum" but knows "they have a lot of political correctness.") Instead, Tampa Liberty School will use "fun, hands-on activities" to promote "principles" like "America is good," "I believe in God," and "I work hard for what I have and I will share it with who I want to. Government cannot force me to be charitable."

I know you are coming up with hilarious parodical Tea Party summer camp activity ideas right now! (The kids all get guns!) But, let me assure you, there is no need, because the real-life Tea Party summer camp is already funnier than any idea you come up with. Listen to this fun, hands-on activity:

Children will win hard, wrapped candies to use as currency for a store, symbolizing the gold standard. On the second day, the "banker" will issue paper money instead. Over time, students will realize their paper money buys less and less, while the candies retain their value.

To be honest, we find the idea of a My First Federal Reserve setting monetary policy and First inflation targets rather endearing! Or you may enjoy this activity:

Starting in an austere room where they are made to sit quietly, symbolizing Europe, the children will pass through an obstacle course to arrive at a brightly decorated party room (the New World).

Red-white-and-blue confetti will be thrown. But afterward the kids will have to clean up the confetti, learning that with freedom comes responsibility.

The smart kids will, of course, use their hard, wrapped candies to pay other kids to clean up the confetti.

[St. Petersburg Times via Pareene]