Maybe you haven't seen Bloomberg BusinessWeek's very edgy and risque new cover? With two airplanes having sex to symbolize airline mergers (-"cockpit" joke here-) ? Well if you haven't it's after the jump, along with an in-depth look at the creative process behind this artwork.

The Atlantic Wire asked Richard Turley, BusinessWeek's well regarded new-ish creative director, how this one came together. "Tell us more about that process," Atlantic Wire asked. Turley broke it down:

It's just me and Josh Tyrangiel, the editor... we sit literally opposite each other.... It was Josh who said, "How about planes having sex for the cover?" And I was like "YES."

Boom! Next thing you know you've got a cover that does not "air" on the side of caution. Fishbowl NY calls it "Another Brilliant Businessweek Cover."

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I actually consider it more crude the clever, and veering toward the awkward-businessman-trying-to-be-cool vibe given off by a recent awful "Etc." section package, in which BBW made jokes about blackmail and advised businesswomen that hitting a Las Vegas strip club (illustrated with not just one but two titty-bar drawings) would turn them into "a team player... [and] will endear you to your male colleagues." Or the recent Steve Balmer cover in which the CEO of Microsoft was reduced to being referred to as "monkey boy," a title given to him 12 years ago in one of the first viral internet videos, because he was sweaty and shouty once when trying to pump up people attending a developer conference (the video, by the way, was barely glanced in BusinessWeek's story).

You can be very clever, BusinessWeek. But stop being so juvenile! Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to get back to writing posts about cannibals marrying vampires and people throwing glitter on each other.

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[Image via bizweekdesign/Flickr]