The "Power Neighborhood" and the "Dead Zone"

All but one of Gawker’s New York-based writers live in Brooklyn, where for the past few days we’ve been spoiled by high-speed internet access, refrigerated food, and running water, but we’ve peered over at blackened downtown Manhattan from afar and thought one thing: Thank god I live in Brooklyn.

Not all of us can be so smug, though: since Sandy hit on Monday, a large proportion of power-less downtown New Yorkers have begun an uptown exodus, seeking shelter or an outlet for their cell phone or some hot food at a friend’s apartment or an open restaurant. Some reports say ConEd will restore power by tomorrow; Mayor Bloomberg said in a press conference today that the “vast bulk of people” currently without power shouldn’t expect restored power until the weekend.

From Business Insider’s Rob Wile, who headed uptown from his Chelsea apartment at 8:30 last night:

I soon realized I was being flanked by about a dozen other downtown sojourners.

We eventually came across a Chase bank on Second Avenue, where a kind soul had purchased a an outlet strip he’d plugged into a wall that was powering five phones (and one laptopThe "Power Neighborhood" and the "Dead Zone").

I was able to upload my East Side photos, but there were at least a half-dozen (very anxious) folks waiting in line behind me.

This effectively leaves Manhattan cut in two: Above 34th street, it’s the “power neighborhood”; below, you’ve got the poor modern human beings of the “dead zone” lined up for access to pay phones.

If you’ve got any stories about how you’ve managed in the “dead zone” or how you’re helping friends who are escaping to somewhere above 34th street, let us know.

Photo of New Yorkers lined up for wifi at Starbucks via @nowthisnews.