'It's All Gonna Be Back': Hunter Moore Lied About Wiping Is Anyone Up's Archives

Sext hustler Hunter Moore has announced plans to launch a new-and-improved site that publishes revenge-porn nudes with names, social-networking links, and home addresses. Along with this user-driven stalker map, the 26-year-old is also threatening to repost much of the old content from his previous site, Is Anyone Up, on HunterMoore.tv. That theoretically means the founder of Dream Water, Twilight star Kiowa Gordon—plus a whole assortment of unwitting Taco Bell employees, teachers, and college kids who thought they were in the clear—will once again be naked online.

But at the time of Is Anyone Up's shutdown, Moore insisted that the site's archives were erased. "Anybody that was ever posted, where it's been ruining your life or your job, everything is completely wiped," he told Adrian Chen last spring. "You're good."

That may not be true. "We are going to start off by launching with all the old IAU content and all new content," the note posted on HunterMoore.tv reads. That could've just meant continuing on with calling ugly people "Gnargoyles," spreading herpes rumors, and labeling young women "Band Whores." You know, really fun stuff. But then in talking with BetaBeat last night, Moore reiterated:

"I have so many secret servers. I got shit in Switzerland, Australia, Canada. All that stuff's accessible it's just on a different domain." He added that any content that was legally questionable before will be gone.

"All these people that thought they were safe: nah, it's all gonna be back," he added.

If HunterMoore.tv does, in fact, repost old Is Anyone Up user-submissions, there are a few prominent issues. For one, many of IAU's original nudes were hacked—socially engineered, to be specific—a fact that's been confirmed in the wake of an FBI investigation that had bureau officers breaking down the door of Moore's Sacramento house and confiscating his computer and phone. Should HunterMoore.tv repost hacked photos, he's knowingly dealing with stolen goods.

Secondarily, Moore's agreement with Bullyville, the site that bought the IsAnyoneUp.com domain, stipulated that IAU's original content could never be published anywhere again. Republishing those photos would most likely cue a civil suit.

Also, for the record, facilitating death by cyberstalking doesn't seem to be one of Moore's concerns:

[Illustration by Jim Cooke]