"Chag Sameach:" Barack Obama Plagiarized his Hanukkah Statement from Previous Holiday GreetingsS

Tonight, of course, marks the first night of Hanukkah and Jewish children everywhere are getting ready to receive their first pairs of socks.

President Obama has just released his yearly statement to proclaim his love of Hanukkah and it does sound a bit familiar. Much like the fabled oil that managed to burn for an impossible eight days, it seems that Obama's press team has made the 2009 White House Hanukkah statement last for four long years.

It's a miracle that shall now be called Obamannukah.

Here's the 2012 statement:

Michelle and I send our warmest wishes to all those celebrating Hanukkah around the world.

This Hanukkah season we remember the powerful story of the Maccabees who rose up to liberate their people from oppression. Upon discovering the desecration of their Temple, the believers found only enough oil to light the lamp for one night. And yet it lasted for eight.

Hanukkah is a time to celebrate the faith and customs of the Jewish people, but it is also an opportunity for people of all faiths to recognize the common aspirations we share. This holiday season, let us give thanks for the blessings we enjoy, and remain mindful of those who are suffering. And let us reaffirm our commitment to building a better, more complete world for all.

From our family to the Jewish Community around the world, Chag Sameach.

It's your standard encouraging statement that's flourished with a customary Jewish greeting that could even make your racist bubby crack a smile. But here's 2009 and 2011's statements (it's worth noting that Obama gave prepared remarks at a White House Hanukkah party in 2010). The bolded parts are ones that appear above, some almost are up top word for word.

2009:

Michelle and I send our warmest wishes to all who are celebrating Hanukkah around the world. The Hanukkah story of the Maccabees and the miracles they witnessed reminds us that faith and perseverance are powerful forces that can sustain us in difficult times and help us overcome even the greatest odds.

Hanukkah is not only a time to celebrate the faith and customs of the Jewish people, but for people of all faiths to celebrate the common aspirations we share. As families, friends and neighbors gather together to kindle the lights, may Hanukkah's lessons inspire us all to give thanks for the blessings we enjoy, to find light in times of darkness, and to work together for a brighter, more hopeful tomorrow.

2011:

Michelle and I send our warmest wishes to all those celebrating Hanukkah around the world.

This Hanukkah season we remember the powerful story of a band of believers who rose up and freed their people, only to discover that the oil left in their desecrated temple – which should have been enough for only one night – ended up lasting for eight.

It's a timeless story of right over might and faith over doubt – one that has given hope to Jewish people everywhere for over 2,000 years. And tonight, as families and friends come together to light the menorah, it is a story that reminds us to count our blessings, to honor the sacrifices of our ancestors, and to believe that through faith and determination, we can work together to build a brighter, better world for generations to come.

From our family to the Jewish Community around the world, Chag Sameach.

Oy vey.

[Image via AP]