Thai Prime Minster Refuses to Resign After Weekend of Deadly Protests

In the most violent conflict in Thailand since 2010, at least four people were killed and more than 100 were injured over the weekend as tens of thousands of pro-and anti-government protestors continued their weeks-long confrontation in the streets of Bangkok. On Tuesday, Yingluck Shinawatra, the country's prime minister, refused to resign despite receiving a vote of no confidence last week from the Thai Parliament.

"Right now we don't see any way to resolve the problem under the constitution," Yingluck said during a brief 12-minute news conference Tuesday morning.

Anti-government protestors—known as Yellow Shirts—view Yingluck as a proxy for her billionaire brother, Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted as prime minster and exiled in 2006 amid a corruption a scandal. Thaksin, who remains popular in the country's rural regions, was convicted in absentia of corruption charges and faces a two-year prison sentence upon his return to Thailand.

On Sunday, Suthep Thaugsuban, a leader of the Yellow Shirts, said Yingluck had two days to "return power to the people unconditionally." Not long after, Thai authorities issues a warrant for his arrest on a charge of insurrection.

Last week, anti-government demonstrators seized several government buildings, including the office of the Ministry of Finance, and over the weekend, protests forced Yingluck to abandon the Government House, which houses the Prime Minister's offices, and relocate to police headquarters.

Despite many of the estimated 70,000 pro-government protesters returning home on Monday, anti-government forces remain outside of the Government House, where police, who initially pledged not to use force against protesters, have resorted to firing tear gas canisters and rubber bullets.

"You can't call this a democracy," Sombat Benjasirimongkol, an anti-government demonstrator, told the Associated Press. "This government is a dictatorship that came to power by buying votes. Yingluck's supporters are poor. They are uneducated. And they are easily bought."

[Image via AP]