[There was a video here]

The above footage comes from the documentary Music for Elephants, which aired last night on Australian television. I will neither confirm nor deny weeping through most of the doc's 45 minute running time, as formerly abused elephant after formerly abused elephant ambled onto the screen and responded to the musical stylings of artist Paul Barton. On the various sanctuaries in Thailand that Barton visited, some elephants stopped in their tracks and stood completely still as they listened to Barton's piano playing near where they ate and/or bathed. Some moved rhythmically (elephants, it turns out, have a terrific sense of rhythm). Some joined in and played along with Barton.

Barton's end game is to bring joy into the lives of these emotionally complex creatures whose lives previously contained little of it (many of them on the Elephants World sanctuary once worked as logging elephants and have been blinded from the twigs they encountered on the job).

"I hope that the elephants might see us humans in a slightly better way than we deserve to be seen considering the lives these elephants have had," said Barton during the documentary's final and most surreal scene, in which he played Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata" in the dark for a lone elephant.

[There was a video here]